Triathlon Diet: Food terms explained


As you stroll through the grocery or health food store, reading product labels in an effort to purchase the most nutritious food available, do you wonder what the term “organic” signifies?  Here are the three ways in which a product qualifies in using the term “organic” as defined by the American Dietetic Association.

100% Organic: Products that are completely organic or made from completely organic ingredients. The USDA Organic seal can be used when labeling these products.
Organic: Products in which at least 95% of its ingredients are organic. The USDA Organic seal can be used when labeling these products.
Made with Organic Ingredients: Products in which at least 70% of its ingredients are organic. The USDA Organic seal cannot be used when labeling these products. Instead, “made with organic ingredients” could appear on the labels of these food products.Organic food can be expensive to purchase, but you can balance your budget by prioritizing the foods that have the most pesticides versus the least.

For example, here is a list taken from here

The Dirty Dozen (buy these organic):
Peach
Apple
Bell Pepper
Celery
Nectarine
Strawberries
Cherries
Kale
Lettuce
Grapes
Carrot
Pear

The Clean 15 (lowest in pesticides)
Onion (least pesticides)
Avocado
Sweet Corn
Pineapple
Mango
Asparagus
Sweet Peas
Kiwi
Cabbage
Eggplant
Papaya
Watermelon
Broccoli
Tomato
Sweet Potato

Also, look at the rest of your shopping cart as you decide whether or not you can afford to purchase organic food. Do you have 3-liters of diet coke, oreo cookies, and a snicker’s bar? If you are willing to give up an item with very little nutritional value, the money saved can be used towards organic apples and spinach. What a great way to practice preventative medicine! To download a pocket size list of the “Dirty Dozen” and “Clean 15,” click “Plenty To learn more about mercury content in fish, here Purchasing organic food also assists farmer’s with paying the price to maintain the necessary standards for production of organic food. For more information about organic food and bodycare products, visit the “Plenty website.To compliment Bill Nadeau’s great interview with Rock Star Triathlete, “Locavore and “Tri-Veg” Explained,” you can learn about the “buy local” movement, by clicking here. Also, a great book about one couple’s year-long journey in eating local, is “Plenty.”

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